The Addictionary of Oxford English: Piercing

Posted by Sir Alexander Johns | Dec 12, 2017 | The Addictionary of Oxford English | 0 |

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Definition of Piercing in English:

Piercing


NOUN

1. A small hole in a part of the body, typically other than the ears, made so as to insert a ring, stud, or other piece of jewellery.

Piercings are an extension of the lobe. The limb. The soul. A man can never have too many.” Oxford English

2. A ring, stud, or other piece of jewellery worn in a pierced part of the body.

 “I’ve always thought of piercings to be the noblest form of personal expression. There’s nothing quite like the rush of pain every time you get a piercing. The needle – the push against your skin – the crack of cartilage – reminds me of my youth. I would get them all again, if I could.” Oxford English


Piercings Quotes about Oxford English

“Oxford English received his first piercing in the girls’ loo at Sorbester Orphanage when he was about… fifteen? Sixteen? There was a girl named Mary Crowell, whom he was sweet on, and she was a bit of a deviant. At least what we considered deviants back in those days. She had three holes in each ear, the trollop. Offered to pierce Oxford’s, too. So she got some ice and some rusty, old needle, and the next day, Oxford was walkin’ ‘round, showing it off to anybody who’d listen. Well, in a few days his ear was purple and full of pus. Moral of the story? Don’t let the orphan lass you fancy stick you with a dirty pin.” Elizabeth Dwyer (Former Sorbester Orphanage Nurse)

“Did you know Oxford took classes to become a professional piercer? Got kicked out by the third one because he kept offering free nipple piercings to everyone. He quite likes nipples, I’ve heard.” John Browning IV (Piercing instructor at Fulham Holes with Silver)

“What does Oxford English have pierced? The better question is, what doesn’t he have pierced? He was going to the tattoo parlor at least once a month while we were married for some new kind of piercing. He’s most proud of his Prince Albert, which shouldn’t surprise anyone, though, given his advanced age, should probably disgust them. We’ve been divorced for quite a long time, but I heard through the grapevine that he has over seventy piercings all over his body.” Tabitha Bartleby-English (Ex-Wife #17)

“Oxford English was in and out of my old shop, Shoreditch Piercing Palace, all the time back in the seventies. He was quite into the punk movement, and insisted on making himself up to look like one of the Sex Pistols. Of course, he was quite a few years older than them, so you can imagine how that went. He said he wanted to impress ‘Mr. Donny Decay.’” Lucius Spragg (Former Owner of Shoreditch Piercing Palace)


Origin

Late 14c., verbal noun from pierce. Late 13c. “make a hole in; force one’s way through,” from Anglo-French perser.


Pronunciation

piercing /ˈpɪəsɪŋ/


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This Dictionary entry was curated by Sir Alexander Johns.


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